Multitasking as a Non-Traditional Student

Copy of MULTITASKING AS A NON-TRADITIONAL STUDENT

When I returned to college in 2013 to obtain my Paralegal Certificate at Manor College, I was a full-time mom and student, part-time fitness instructor, and intern as a Paralegal. In addition, I dog sat and worked part-time in a floral shop.

Where did I find the time? Multitasking and time management. A calendar on my phone was a must (including a paper backup – one time I deleted my phone calendar and needless to say, it was crazy until I could recover it). Ever since then, I use a backup program for my phone called Samsung Kies.

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Transferring in 1994

I am a non-traditional college student who has transferred. Currently, I am a full-time paralegal, part-time fitness instructor and single Mom to two girls ages 15 and 12.

I graduated high school in 1984 (anyone remember George Orwell?) and the first college I attended was Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York in 1985. Skidmore College was a small, Ivy League-ish, personal college where everyone knew each other and your professor called you by name. I spent a year there as a Pre-Law Major (Political Economy). As much as I tried to like it, the weather (a lot of snow) and the distance from home (3 ½ hours away) was not for me. I wanted to pursue a career in dance and at 19, it was then or never.

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A Grateful Guest

In this guest blog post, Kirk shares his own experience as a transfer student from a unique perspective—having seen his twin go off to college, and as an older student. 

When I first came to State College, Pennsylvania, I was not there as a prospective student, but a supporting brother; my twin, Luke, was attending a summer orientation session full of mysterious acronyms and peppy undergrads, and I was merely a bystander. As a person who had enjoyed a quiet childhood in a small town that had been my home since birth, Penn State’s sprawling and regal campus felt alien and intimidating. However, even whilst being shuttled from place to place, losing my sense of direction with every change of location, the experience was warming and ultimately fueled my desire to visit my brother multiple times a year and eventually transfer there as a junior myself.

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All But Three

It was all pretty exciting. Two years had gone by at community college and I was ready to transfer to a university in Chicago. I had planned for this since leaving high school. Go to community college, save a boatload of money, and then transfer out to a university after two years. It’s the same route a lot of other students take all over the country. Community college is really becoming a more and more popular option. Continue reading “All But Three”

My Story: The Jack Kent Cooke Scholarship

Note: Guest blogger Isla M. shares her insights about the Jack Kent Cooke Foundation’s Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship. If you have any questions or comments about the scholarship or process, please comment below!

Applying for scholarships can be very stressful. The Jack Kent Cooke scholarship application is one of the more extensive applications I’ve dealt with, but if you are willing and dedicated enough to put in the effort, the payoff is incredible.

I was awarded the Jack Kent Cooke Undergraduate Transfer Scholarship in May 2016, a few days after graduating from Manor College with my Associates in Science. Receiving this scholarship has been a life-changing event. The Jack Kent Cooke foundation provides up to $40,000 a year for up to two years for tuition, fees, books, living expenses, and even child care expenses for recipients with dependent children. It is important to note that the foundation doesn’t wish to displace any financial assistance (FAFSA, merit scholarships, institutional aid, etc.) that students will be receiving upon transferring. They simply wish to bridge the gap between the financial assistance scholars are already receiving and the financial assistance they need.  

The Cooke foundation works tirelessly to make the transfer from your two year school as easy as possible by not only providing financial assistance, but also a network of people and resources outside of the financial aspect of the scholarship. Cooke scholars are even eligible for graduate school funding of up to $50,000 a year for up to four years! As someone who has grappled with the application process, I want to provide some insight on my experience to help other potential scholars in the future.

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Transfer Advice: A Professor’s Viewpoint II

Note: This article is the second part of a two-part series of transfer advice from Mary Sims, a professor at Arcadia University and Manor College. You can find the first part here.

Once you’re at your transfer institution, you may even want to take courses that will help you hone skills outside of your major, even if they are not required, as long as they count for credit towards graduation. For example, I truly believe that everyone should take psychology to help them understand and deal with the people they will be interacting with for their entire life. It is important to think about what you want to achieve at all points in the process. After all, it is your future.

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Transfer Advice: A Professor’s Viewpoint

Note: This article is the first part of a two-part series of transfer advice from Mary Sims, a professor at Arcadia University and Manor College. 

As a professor and advisor at a two-year college for more than two decades, my favorite part of my job is that I am always asked for help and advice about transferring to another college or university.

While each transfer situation has its own set of particular circumstances, there are many commonalities to the transfer experience; I’d like to share some thoughts and tips on the process that should relate to everyone contemplating changing or transferring in their academic careers.

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